Introduction

This post is about implementing a web-job in azure which will restart a service on a predefined interval. When restarting a service on a predefined interval clearly says that there is some problem with the implementation, we may rely on this as an emergency measure until we tackle the problem. Here we will ignore the implication behind it but will focus on how to get this done. To get this done, we need an application in AD which has the required permission to restart the service. The components which are required in this process are as mentioned below. Even when scripts are available to create application for you, it is good to go via the portal way to make sure that we do what we understood.

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Logging is one of the very important factor in any application. You require it to analyse what when and how things went wrong. It serves as the log of the application. But when you have multiple instance of the same application running in parallel, then you don’t have the purpose served properly by the logging mechanism as it will be writing all the log entry into the same file and the log will be cluttered. Here in this post we will discuss how to handle this typical situation when you have multiple instances running at the same time and log4net writes all the logs into the same file.

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Introduction

I started on this issue when I had my WCF service times out when I am trying a normal socket connection. This was running fine in windows 8. We had a keep-alive WCF call which tells the server that the client is still active. For this we need the port sharing to be enabled on the machine. I was on an impression that the port sharing was not working and because of which it fails. From the log I came to a conclusion that the keep alive was failing so this made me doubt the TCP port sharing. But I could also see that when I install visual studio, then the application works. This made me doubt the .net framework. Finally I detected the slow network. This was the real culprit.

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Introduction

In this post we will see how we can identify if the application has been maximized or it is restored to normal state. We will use the Resize event equivalent in WPF which is SizeChanged event. We will subscribe to this event and will check the window state to identify if the window has been maximized or it is restored to normal.

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Introduction

There are scenarios where we have to show a standalone message box even before the application main window is launched. In such scenario, we need to do something different. Say if we have a composite application with a bootstrapper, and we want to show some error while running a bootstrapper, it may look difficult because we don’t have a parent window. In such scenario, we can show the message box as shown below.

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